The 17 Best Dark Matter Books for Science Aficionados

  • Post last modified:November 4, 2021
  • Post category:Books

Looking for the best dark matter books? I’ve got you covered.

The list below includes books on dark matter, dark energy, black holes, and all the mysteries of our vast universe. 

So let’s get right in!

An Introduction to Particle Dark Matter by Stefano Profumo

What is dark matter, and how was it produced? What holds the galaxies together? How do the particles interact, and what are their properties? 

Dark matter is a significant discovery at the forefront of cosmology and elementary particle physics. 

This book discusses cutting-edge techniques for creating and testing particle models for dark matter.

What’s in it for you:

  • Over 200 problems to get you thinking
  • Detailed guidance and methods in the field
  • The basics of cosmology and particle physics to understand dark matter particle models
  • And so much more!

2. Chandra’s Cosmos by Wallace Tucker

Chandra’s Cosmos by Wallace Tucker

23 July 1999.

The most formidable telescope in human history, the Chandra X-Ray Observatory, was launched aboard the spacecraft Columbia. 

Since then, we’ve discovered large parts of the universe that were hidden from us.

In this book, Tucker uses short anecdotes to narrate the telescope’s observation of the heated, high-energy surface of the universe.

What’s in it for you:

  • Dark matter, dark energy, enormous clusters of galaxies
  • The cosmic web, neutron stars, exoplanets,  black holes
  • And so much more!

3. Dark Matter and Dark Energy by Brian Clegg

Dark Matter and Dark Energy by Brian Clegg

The most significant puzzle science has ever encountered: all the matter and light we observe in the universe is only five percent of it all. 

The rest? Hidden.

Since the 1970s, scientists and astronomers have speculated that galaxies have too little matter to explain how they spin around: they should spin apart, but something hidden keeps them together. 

That “something”? Dark matter.

What’s in it for you:

  • The central dilemma in modern science and how scientists are finding solutions to it
Dark Matter and the Dinosaurs by Lisa Randall

Sixty-six million years ago.

A ten-mile-wide celestial body bolted into Earth’s atmosphere at an astonishing speed. 

Its impact wiped out the dinosaurs and other species on the planet. But what if this calamity revealed something more remarkable: the interconnectedness of the universe?

What’s in it for you:

  • The story of the powerful forces that support our existence
  • The mysterious, elusive dark matter and how it affects our planet
  • The most thrilling, improbable science book you’ll ever read
Dark Matter, Missing Planets and New Comets by Tom Van Flandern

Highly respected scientists will willingly concede that the Big Bang Theory is incomplete. 

Forging its own path, this book explains why the theory is wrong and offers a substitute in its place.

What’s in it for you:

  • A novel approach to perpetual cosmology issues
  • A new dimension that explains the nature of matter and the origin of the solar system
  • A straightforward new theory without all the confusing scientific jargon

6. Dark Side of the Universe by Iain Nicolson

Dark Side of the Universe by Iain Nicolson

Long, long ago, we believed the universe was filled with dust, planets, stars, and galaxies. 

Today, we know dark matter makes up more than ninety-five percent of all matter in the universe. It bends space and time, keeps the stars spinning, and controls the fate of the cosmos.

What’s in it for you:

  • The mysterious new energy – dark energy – expanding the universe
  • A thrilling account of how our ideas about nature and the universe have evolved
  • Fundamental discoveries, concepts, and current thinking on dark energy and dark matter

7. Einstein’s Telescope by Evalyn Gates

Einstein’s Telescope by Evalyn Gates

1936.

Albert Einstein predicts that gravitational distortions would turn space into a telescope far more powerful than anything humans could ever invent.

Today, cosmologists use this revolutionary technique to observe the invisible. 

In this book, Gates explains how scientists use this tool to discover black holes and planets as large as the Earth and track back the evolution of cosmic architecture over millions and billions of years.

What’s in it for you:

  • An intriguing dive into dark energy, dark matter, and black holes
  • The most profound mysteries of the universe

8. Hubble in Space by Amherst Media

Hubble in Space by Amherst Media

This book contains curated images of space from 1990 to 2017: stars, comets, moons, planets, exoplanets, solar systems, supernovas, the Milky Way, black holes, nebulae, galaxies, and so much more.

What’s in it for you:

  • Experience the vastness of our universe
  • Stellar, galactic evolution through breathtaking colorful images

9. In Search of Dark Matter by Robert Freeman

In Search of Dark Matter by Robert Freeman

This book, geared toward non-scientists and scientists alike, spans a range of scientific disciplines, from astronomy to physics.

What’s in it for you:

  • Concepts at the cutting edge of scientific research
  • Easy to understand language for all 

10. Particle Dark Matter by Gianfranco Bertone

Particle Dark Matter by Gianfranco Bertone

Dark matter is an open problem in modern physics. 

This book provides observational evidence for dark matter and a detailed discussion of cutting-edge numerical simulations with possible explanations of modified gravity.

What’s in it for you:

  • Explains the experimental and theoretical aspects of dark matter
  • Offers theory, observations, and experiments to give a complete understanding of dark matter
  • Includes contributions from 48 prominent experts
Prime Elements of Ordinary Matter, Dark Matter, and Dark Energy by Vladimir Ginzburg

Almost 2600 years ago, vortex theory was established at the dawn of science. Since then, it has passed through five phases of discoveries during the Greek civilization, the Copernicus Revolution, the age of electromagnetism, the atomic age, and the information age.

This book narrates, from the beginning, the detailed history of the vortex theory.

What’s in it for you:

  • An introduction to the vortex theory
  • Cutting-edge discoveries, such as the toryx and the Three-Dimensional Spiral String

12. The 4-Percent Universe by Richard Panek

The 4-Percent Universe by Richard Panek

All the stars and planets make up only 4% of matter in our universe. 

The rest? Completely unknown. 

In this book, Panek tells us the stories of the scientists who spent a significant part of the last few decades searching for the secrets of dark matter and dark energy.

What’s in it for you:

  • The greatest mysteries in science
  • A fast-paced story with in-depth reporting and behind-the-scenes details

13. The Cosmic Cocktail by Katherine Freese

The Cosmic Cocktail: Three Parts Dark Matter by Katherine Freese

Ordinary atoms comprise only 5% of all energy and matter in the cosmos. The rest is described as dark energy and dark matter because of their unknown quantities.

This book is an intimate dive into the grand quest to unlock the secrets of dark matter, one of the most captivating puzzles of modern science.

What’s in it for you:

  • An investigation into what constitutes our universe
  • A blend of cutting-edge science with behind-the-scenes insights
  • Discoveries from visionary scientists, such as Fritz Zwicky
  • The foundation to fathom humanity’s quest to understand the universe

14. The Dark Matter Problem by Robert Sanders

The Dark Matter Problem by Robert Sanders

Currently, most astronomers and physicists believe that dark matter constitutes a large part of our universe.

However, dark matter is invincible to contemporary detection methods, although it explains several astronomical observations.

This book narrates the history of dark matter over the last 75 years and why it is now a significant aspect of astronomy and cosmology.

What’s in it for you:

  • A discussion of current attempts to detect dark matter
  • An introduction to an alternative theory to dark matter: Modified Newtonian Dynamics (MOND)
  • A compelling overview of dark matter and dark energy 

15. The Invisible Universe by Eleftherios Papantonopoulos (Editor)

The Invisible Universe by Eleftherios Papantonopoulos (Editor)

In the past years, the modern cosmology has become obsessed with the nature of dark matter and dark energy.

The offspring of a tutorial summer school, this extensive volume is aimed toward young researchers and postgraduate students in modern cosmology and astrophysics.

What’s in it for you:

  • An advanced level textbook for cosmology aficionados

16. Three Steps to the Universe by David and Richard Garfinkle

Three Steps to the Universe by David and Richard Garfinkle

Scientists cannot fly within one million miles of the sun, but how do they know what it’s made of?

They can’t see black holes, too, so what makes them so sure they even exist?

This book answers these questions and takes you on tour through the most complex phenomena in cosmology.

What’s in it for you:

  • An exploration of how scientists gather knowledge about the universe
  • Black holes, dark energy, and dark matter

17. We Have No Idea by Jorge Cham and Daniel Whiteson

We Have No Idea by Jorge Cham

In a vast universe where we have no clue what’s going on, a cartoonist and a physicist come together to explore this strange, enigmatic cosmos.

Cham and Whiteson enthusiastically investigate the biggest unknowns, why they remain mysterious, and what the geniuses are doing to bring us answers.

With humor and delight, they dare us to open our eyes to the vastness of our mostly uncharted universe that’s still ours to explore.

What’s in it for you:

  • Charming insights into what we actually understand about our universe
  • A highly captivating illustrated book about the great mysteries of science
  • An accessible guide to quarks, neutrinos, black holes, dark energy, and dark matter

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